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Canticle of Brother Sun of St. Francis of Assisi

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One of the most well-known Catholic Christian saints is St. Francis of Assisi. Few people realize that St. Francis of Assisi was a devote of the Sun, Earth and Nature. St. Francis of Assisi say God in all life and honored the Sun for it’s life giving properties. This article shows the similarities between St. Francis of Assisi’s teachings and the Yoga and Vedas of India.

Canticle of Brother Sun of St. Francis of Assisi

Introduction:

St. Francis of Assisi was a rather unusual 12th Century Catholic Saint, whose hymns such as the Canticle of Brother Sun reflect strong Pagan, and thus Vedantic, Yogic and other ideas that today, can be explained through the only surviving ‘Indo-European’ tradition of Paganism.

Among his many attributes, he also adhered to a simple non-materialistic lifestyle, food and dress, and had great reverence for the poor and animals – reminiscent of Buddhist and Jaina doctrines in India, and also Sanyassis (those who have renounced life) in the path to Enlightenment.

It reflects a non-dualistic and non-dogmatic doctrine, quite unlike Catholicism itself. His hymns also reflect the same Vedantic echoes.

We see this in his suffering through his operation when he was going blind, and his prayer to the Brother Fire or Divine Fire to withstand the heat. This is much in line with Pagan and Vedic ideas, as opposed to just Christ alone!

We wonder if his visions of Christ to ‘heal his Church’ – were indeed to restore some sense of original pagan sense to the teachings and tradition itself.

Indeed, it seems St. Francis is a Priest of Mithras reborn as a Seer to restore Christianity, but failed.

Hymn:

Most High Almighty Good Lord, Yours are praise, glory, honor and all blessings; To You alone! Most High, do they belong, and no man is worthy of speaking Your Name!

Vedic Commentary:

The most high of which no man can speak the name is the Impersonal All-pervading Brahman, of whom assumes so many forms and names.

That this verse is here at the beginning is not necessarily Christian – but also is strongly suggestive that the following ‘deities’ referred to in a more bhakti-yogic (devotional) theme, are forms of this Almighty.

Hymn:

Be praised, Lord, with all Your creatures, and above all our Brother Sun, who gives us the day by which You light our way, and who is beautiful, radiant and with his great splendor is a symbol to us of You, O Most High!

Vedic Commentary:

Brother Sun, of who St. Francis states is a symbol of the Lord is reminiscent of the Rig Vedic hymns, where the Sun (Surya) is the symbol of both the Supreme Impersonal Godhead (Brahman) and the eye or symbol of the gods Mitra and Varuna, who appear in Christianity as the Divine Father (Varuna, Ouranos) and Christ the son (being Mitra or Mithras).

In ancient Egypt, as in India – the Sun-God (Ram, Ra or Surya) was revered as the Supreme and as a King, also, when personified.

Hymn:

And be praised, Lord, for our Sister Moon and the Stars. You created them in the heavens bright, precious and beautiful!

Vedic Commentary:

The Sister Moon and Stars reminds us of the Divine Mother who, in all ancient religions is the Moon. As Durga and Kali she is the moon and, more specifically, the night sky or Prishni (spotted).

The Nakshatras (stars) are also important in ancient astrology, and connected to the Moon and hence Lunar astrology, which is the older in the ancient world. It thus suggests also a pagan influence and practice.

Hymn:

And be praised, Lord, for our Brother the Wind and for the air and the clouds and for fair weather and for all other through which You sustain Your creatures.

Vedic Commentary:

The wind who sustains all creatures is much like Vayu or Prana – the Vedic spirit of Air and also Life-force, of which is the Soul of all beings that animates them.

The brother-wind is also the great Hanuman, of whom is the ally of Rama the great incarnation of the Sun – and also man’s own personal friend. It is also Lord Shiva or Rudra, who controls the Universe and it’s actions through demigods – which here is compared to storms in nature and their control. Shiva is also Vedic Indra.

Hymn:

And be praised, Lord, for our Sister Water, so useful, and humble, and chaste!

Vedic Commentary:

The Sister Water reminds us of the ancient Rivers of ancient times – especially in India, where the Rivers Yamuna and Ganga (Ganges) are revered in high esteem, as holy waters (which St. Francis makes mention of here as ‘chaste’).

Hymn:

And be praised, my Lord, for our Brother Fire, through whom You light up the night and who is handsome, joyful, robust, and strong!

Vedic Commentary:

Brother Fire is the Divine Youth – Agni of the Rig Veda, described as a youthful war-god, baby or child (Skanda-kumara). He is also connected to Krishna is also the lord of strength and born from power or strength (Shakti). He is Aries.

Hymn:

And be praised, my Lord, for our Sister, Mother Earth, who supports and carries us and produces the diverse fruits and colorful flowers and trees!

Praise and bless the Lord and give thanks to Him and serve Him with great humility!

Vedic Commentary:

Sister Earth who is the Mother is seen in all ancient pagan religions also, as the World Mother’s form in the localised aspect. She is Bhumi or Prithvi of the Vedas – the spouse of spirit or Sky (Dyaus, Zeus or JHVH) – who is the Lord.

Hymn:

Be praised, my Lord, for our Sister, bodily Death from whom no living man can escape!

Vedic Commentary:

Sister death is none-other than the Divine Mother who, as Mother Kali or Yami (Isis) , assumes the terrible form that takes our soul at death and consumes us.

Sister death is very much a spiritual non-Christian thought, as also the bodily death.

The bodily death is also the Mayaic (illusory) death – which is personified as a female, the Divine Mother in the form of Creation of which is Illusion (Maya).

Hymn:

Woe only to those who die in mortal sin; but blessed are those who have done Your most holy will; for the second death can cause them no harm!

Vedic Commentary:

The second death can also be the yogic death. This is much like Vedanta, where the first death is the mortal death – but the second death is the destruction of the ego and hence – liberation of the Soul, rather than bondage.

It means we go beyond Maya or the Goddess as the Illusory World and thus false death or creation.

This also means liberation from lower aspects such as Heavens and Hells as well as Samsara (reincarnation).

Source: http://satyavidya.com/stfrancis.htm

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This entry was posted on Saturday, September 16th, 2017 at 4:26 pm and is filed under Articles.

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2 Comments

Wayne said:

on August 15th, 2011

It’s not surprising that Saint Francis’s hymn has Vedic teachings. He has had past embodiments in India; his last was as Kuthumi Lal Singh, who cofounded the Theosophical Society. He also established the separate order of Atonite priests at the sun temple of On as the pharaoh Thutmose III, and taught sungazing as Pythagoras. For more information on his current teachings, visit http://www.heartscenter.org

[Reply]

SunYogi Reply:

Thank you Wayne for sharing your knowledge. For anyone who wants to read more from Wayne, his Sun Gazers Gazette newsletters are full of rare information.

[Reply]

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