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The Effect of Light and Color on Human Physiology

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Prof. Dr. hc Orm Bergold M.D provides a concise summery of science that shows how full spectrum light and color therapy affects human physiology. Learn how the pineal gland responds to light by creating different hormones such as melatonin. Learn how the body has many photoactive molecules the respond to sunlight.

The Effect of Light and Color on Human Physiology, Duro-Test Vita-Lite Full Spectrum Lighting Simulates Natural Light!

Raum & Zeit, “The Effect of Light and Color on Human Physiology,” Prof. Dr. hc Orm Bergold M.D. It is becoming increasingly apparent that humans are as intimately dependent upon light as plants are.

Phototherapy and photodynamic therapy have found more recent application in cancer treatment by a process which primes cancer cells with photoactive chemicals such hematoporphyrine and then exposes them to light.

The Effect of Light and Color on Human Physiology

Most information has to do with light. No one doubts that light-based transmission of information is infinitely faster and more efficient than the oxidation-reduction metabolic transmission system which medical science insists is the only one humans have. Therefore, plants are light-based systems and humans metabolic redox systems. But it is an estrogenically false assumption that humans derive nothing from exposure to light other than scorched buns. Oh sure, doctors say, the sun and all that diurnal stuff may have some vague but not particularly important relationship with human kind, but basically such drivel can be ignored.

However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that humans are as intimately dependent upon light as plants are. Plants are loaded with pigmented light sensitive photoreceptor molecules, generically called phytochromes of which chlorophyll is an example. Humans, by way of extension and analogy, can be described as tissue sandwiches liberally slathered with plant derived pigmented photoreceptor molecules, generically referred to as cryptochromes in that, while the exact molecule has not yet been discovered, it is known to be a flavin of some variety.

Role of Pineal Gland

The modern medical pineal gland paradigm now places it as the regulatory gland which regulates all other regulatory glands. Functionally, the pineal is described as a neuroendocrine transducer which translates retinally received light wave generated, neuronal impulses into hormonal regulatory messages. Melatonin, an indoleamin hormone related to the plant growth hormone, ausin, is the chief pineal messenger. Melatonin shows definite circadian and circumannual patterns related to light intensity, frequency and photo period. Pineal levels are higher during night and winter than during day and summer, for example, the light precipitated cascade of hormonal events affects the behavior, growth and physiological status of all plants, animals, and humans. It is an absolute certainty that the character of light emitted by the sun eight minutes ago is already beginning to express itself in our physiology. This process occurs independent of one’s conscious perception. The process occurs irrespective of rationalizations to the contrary or some belief that our behavior or physiological status has nothing whatever to do with light.

Light and Colors

It is just where the medical paradigm light-human interactions ends, that things start to get interesting. For instance, the human photoreceptor flavin molecules are not limited conveniently to the retina but rather are ubiquitous, being found in virtually every tissue. What are they doing there if, indeed, the whole light-human story is limited to the retinal-pineal axis? What extraocular light transduced products are formed? What function do these products have?

Flavins are not the only photoactive molecules: carotenes, melanin, and heme molecules such as hemoglobin and bilirubin are photoactive in addition to a great variety of metaloencymes. The fact that the difference between chlorophyll and hemoglobin is essentially that, in the case of hemoglobin, magnesium has been replaced by iron in the molecular hum begins to take on unsuspected significance.

One who has done research long ago in plants was the world’s first biophysicist, J. C. Bose, an Indian physicist, who in the early years of this century was working with ingenious weights, pulleys and strings he produced thoroughly modern graphics “etched” on carbon sooted glass by a chicken feather moving as the plants moved. He eventually was the first demonstrating that “soul-less” plants responded to all sorts of stimuli exactly as animals did, that they had electrical properties and showed memory for events. “The barriers which have seemed to separate kindred phenomena will be found to have vanished, the plants and animals appearing as a multiform unity in a single ocean of being.” (Jagadis Chunder Bose, 1926) – and men , since we now know that we possess several DNA segments which are possessed by all living things.

Given the abundance of similarities in plant and animal photobiochemistry, it is difficult to understand why phototherapy applications have been so limited or why they have taken so long to appear on the medical horizon. Dermatologists routinely use ultraviolet light as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of some acne, psoriasis or other refractive skin conditions. “Blue light” is a therapy in the 430nm to 450nm light spectra range. Phototherapy and photodynamic therapy have found more recent application in cancer treatment by a process which primes cancer cells with photoactive chemicals such hematoporphyrine and then exposes them to light. The “blue light” phenomenon which probably plays a role in the applications mentioned, deserves serious research attention. Its significance lies in the fact that blue light range, 400nm to 500nm, corresponds to the absorption and action spectra of many extremely vital biomolecules. The spectra for these biomolecules are as distinctive and characteristic as are the spectra for the elements of which they are composed such as carbon hydrogen and nitrogen. Of special interest in this range is the photoreactivation phenomena. Essentially, photoreactivation is a fundamental DNA repair process common to all phylla, from the lowest to the highest life forms. It is a special case in which, after DNA has sustained pyrimidine dimer damage due to ultra violet light exposure, subsequent exposure to blue light not only results in repair of the DNA dimer damage but also, as if by magic, causes other seemingly unrelated cellular repair to take place. Curiously, although this rather dramatic healing mechanism is well recognized and has looked at academically, little serious work has been done with regard to evaluating the immense clinical significance of such a fundamental healing process.

Raum & Zeit, “The Effect of Light and Color on Human Physiology,” Prof. Dr. hc Orm Bergold M.D.

Source: http://www.full-spectrum-lighting.com/durotest/Effect%20Of%20Light%20%26%20Color.htm

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This entry was posted on Friday, October 2nd, 2009 at 3:31 am and is filed under Articles.

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One Comment

lovely2510 said:

on April 26th, 2011

The power of the sunlight indeed can not be fathom but one thing is sure, sunlight makes us physically healthy with the basic vitamins A and D. Sun light indeed gives life!

[Reply]

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